/page/2
velvetrunway:

The Row Autumn-Winter 2014
Posted by go-kitsch

velvetrunway:

The Row Autumn-Winter 2014

Posted by go-kitsch

(via thegiftsoflife)

cinoh:

in ‘interfunktionen 3,’ 1969
Offset; on page 83 of publication
magazine, 29.5 x 22 cm
Edition: 50, signed and numbered
Publisher: F. W. Heubach, Cologne

[in ‘interfunktionen’]

  • 1969–1971
  • interfunktionen issues 2–7, containing multiples by Beuys

Cologne-based F. W. Heubach founded the art and theory magazine interfunktionen in 1968. He used this publication as a platform for artists who held no affinity for Pop Art, kinetic art, environmental art and minimalism, which had dominated that year’s documenta 4 exhibition.1 Published at irregular intervals over the next seven years, the twelve issues of the magazine served as vessels for distributing information and as artworks in their own right. With a changing roster of authors and editors, interfunktionen became an influential voice in the West German art world.2 Fifty to sixty copies of each issue’s print run were special editions, containing contributions by invited artists.

Asked to contribute to issues two through seven of interfunktionen, Beuys used the magazine to publish photographs of his recent performances, print texts on topics like the ideal art academy, or reproduce existing drawings and other artworks. By adding stamps, inscriptions, and hand-collaged elements to this material, he transformed it into a series of multiples.


Catalogue Raisonné No.: 10

in ‘interfunktionen' - I am a sender. I transmit!

cinoh:

 Christo (b. 1935), Wrapped Walk Ways: Two Parks Project, 1970. Pencil, cloth, wax crayons, photography, paperclips, map and tape on cardboard, 71 x 56 cm.

cinoh:

 Christo (b. 1935), Wrapped Walk Ways: Two Parks Project, 1970. Pencil, cloth, wax crayons, photography, paperclips, map and tape on cardboard, 71 x 56 cm.

(Source: blastedheath)

cinoh:

Lacaton & Vassal, maison bioclimatique à Floirac, first and second version models.

See pictures of the house here

(Source: victortsu)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is “A Painting – Ahmed Barka”, painted (or rather, not!) in 1970 by the wise Italian trickster Giulio Paolini. The piece is now in a show that pays tribute to him,  curated by Begum Yasar at Dominique Levy's gallery in New York. Rather than being an actual painting, the work seen in today’s Pic is in fact a photo-sensitized canvas printed with a photo of a painted beige monochrome, which has been marked with rudimentary perspective lines. That monochrome was Paolini’s first work, done in 1960, when it was meant to “ make the  space of representation  visible  rather than carrying out the act of representation”, according to Yasar’s text. The 1960 canvas stands as the pre-condition, as it were, for all of post-medieval art – for what lies under the entire Old Master tradition – while at the same time sitting comfortably among the radical reductions of avant-garde, anti-Old Master modernists such as Yves Klein. (Actually, almost no Old Master paintings have their vanishing points dead center, but for some reason we always imagine it there.)
But of course, that painted surface isn’t really Paolini’s piece from 1970: In his title, he ascribed the canvas to a (fictional) painter named Ahmed Barka. (Another 13 identical photos give the same painting to other authors.) The piece Paolini is willing to put his name on at Levy is the photograph, which supersedes both the Old Masters and the old moderns and takes us into conceptual space. Or maybe, by virtue of attaching a non-Western name to his painting, Paolini’s carrying us all the way forward into postmodernism.  All I know is that this is one mise-en-abyme that I’m happy to fall into. (Private Collection, Lugano, © Giulio Paolini; photo by Elisabeth Bernstein, courtesy Dominique Lévy Gallery, New York)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is “A Painting – Ahmed Barka”, painted (or rather, not!) in 1970 by the wise Italian trickster Giulio Paolini. The piece is now in a show that pays tribute to him,  curated by Begum Yasar at Dominique Levy's gallery in New York. Rather than being an actual painting, the work seen in today’s Pic is in fact a photo-sensitized canvas printed with a photo of a painted beige monochrome, which has been marked with rudimentary perspective lines. That monochrome was Paolini’s first work, done in 1960, when it was meant to “ make the  space of representation  visible  rather than carrying out the act of representation”, according to Yasar’s text. The 1960 canvas stands as the pre-condition, as it were, for all of post-medieval art – for what lies under the entire Old Master tradition – while at the same time sitting comfortably among the radical reductions of avant-garde, anti-Old Master modernists such as Yves Klein. (Actually, almost no Old Master paintings have their vanishing points dead center, but for some reason we always imagine it there.)

But of course, that painted surface isn’t really Paolini’s piece from 1970: In his title, he ascribed the canvas to a (fictional) painter named Ahmed Barka. (Another 13 identical photos give the same painting to other authors.) The piece Paolini is willing to put his name on at Levy is the photograph, which supersedes both the Old Masters and the old moderns and takes us into conceptual space. Or maybe, by virtue of attaching a non-Western name to his painting, Paolini’s carrying us all the way forward into postmodernism.  All I know is that this is one mise-en-abyme that I’m happy to fall into. (Private Collection, Lugano, © Giulio Paolini; photo by Elisabeth Bernstein, courtesy Dominique Lévy Gallery, New York)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

(via thinkingimages)

(Source: pursuable, via hippybeachgirl)

velvetrunway:

The Row Autumn-Winter 2014
Posted by go-kitsch

velvetrunway:

The Row Autumn-Winter 2014

Posted by go-kitsch

(via thegiftsoflife)

cinoh:

Anselm Kiefer

cinoh:

Anselm Kiefer

(Source: paintedout)

cinoh:

in ‘interfunktionen 3,’ 1969
Offset; on page 83 of publication
magazine, 29.5 x 22 cm
Edition: 50, signed and numbered
Publisher: F. W. Heubach, Cologne

[in ‘interfunktionen’]

  • 1969–1971
  • interfunktionen issues 2–7, containing multiples by Beuys

Cologne-based F. W. Heubach founded the art and theory magazine interfunktionen in 1968. He used this publication as a platform for artists who held no affinity for Pop Art, kinetic art, environmental art and minimalism, which had dominated that year’s documenta 4 exhibition.1 Published at irregular intervals over the next seven years, the twelve issues of the magazine served as vessels for distributing information and as artworks in their own right. With a changing roster of authors and editors, interfunktionen became an influential voice in the West German art world.2 Fifty to sixty copies of each issue’s print run were special editions, containing contributions by invited artists.

Asked to contribute to issues two through seven of interfunktionen, Beuys used the magazine to publish photographs of his recent performances, print texts on topics like the ideal art academy, or reproduce existing drawings and other artworks. By adding stamps, inscriptions, and hand-collaged elements to this material, he transformed it into a series of multiples.


Catalogue Raisonné No.: 10

in ‘interfunktionen' - I am a sender. I transmit!

cinoh:

 Christo (b. 1935), Wrapped Walk Ways: Two Parks Project, 1970. Pencil, cloth, wax crayons, photography, paperclips, map and tape on cardboard, 71 x 56 cm.

cinoh:

 Christo (b. 1935), Wrapped Walk Ways: Two Parks Project, 1970. Pencil, cloth, wax crayons, photography, paperclips, map and tape on cardboard, 71 x 56 cm.

(Source: blastedheath)

cinoh:

Lacaton & Vassal, maison bioclimatique à Floirac, first and second version models.

See pictures of the house here

(Source: victortsu)

(Source: dinalun, via organicamagazine)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is “A Painting – Ahmed Barka”, painted (or rather, not!) in 1970 by the wise Italian trickster Giulio Paolini. The piece is now in a show that pays tribute to him,  curated by Begum Yasar at Dominique Levy's gallery in New York. Rather than being an actual painting, the work seen in today’s Pic is in fact a photo-sensitized canvas printed with a photo of a painted beige monochrome, which has been marked with rudimentary perspective lines. That monochrome was Paolini’s first work, done in 1960, when it was meant to “ make the  space of representation  visible  rather than carrying out the act of representation”, according to Yasar’s text. The 1960 canvas stands as the pre-condition, as it were, for all of post-medieval art – for what lies under the entire Old Master tradition – while at the same time sitting comfortably among the radical reductions of avant-garde, anti-Old Master modernists such as Yves Klein. (Actually, almost no Old Master paintings have their vanishing points dead center, but for some reason we always imagine it there.)
But of course, that painted surface isn’t really Paolini’s piece from 1970: In his title, he ascribed the canvas to a (fictional) painter named Ahmed Barka. (Another 13 identical photos give the same painting to other authors.) The piece Paolini is willing to put his name on at Levy is the photograph, which supersedes both the Old Masters and the old moderns and takes us into conceptual space. Or maybe, by virtue of attaching a non-Western name to his painting, Paolini’s carrying us all the way forward into postmodernism.  All I know is that this is one mise-en-abyme that I’m happy to fall into. (Private Collection, Lugano, © Giulio Paolini; photo by Elisabeth Bernstein, courtesy Dominique Lévy Gallery, New York)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is “A Painting – Ahmed Barka”, painted (or rather, not!) in 1970 by the wise Italian trickster Giulio Paolini. The piece is now in a show that pays tribute to him,  curated by Begum Yasar at Dominique Levy's gallery in New York. Rather than being an actual painting, the work seen in today’s Pic is in fact a photo-sensitized canvas printed with a photo of a painted beige monochrome, which has been marked with rudimentary perspective lines. That monochrome was Paolini’s first work, done in 1960, when it was meant to “ make the  space of representation  visible  rather than carrying out the act of representation”, according to Yasar’s text. The 1960 canvas stands as the pre-condition, as it were, for all of post-medieval art – for what lies under the entire Old Master tradition – while at the same time sitting comfortably among the radical reductions of avant-garde, anti-Old Master modernists such as Yves Klein. (Actually, almost no Old Master paintings have their vanishing points dead center, but for some reason we always imagine it there.)

But of course, that painted surface isn’t really Paolini’s piece from 1970: In his title, he ascribed the canvas to a (fictional) painter named Ahmed Barka. (Another 13 identical photos give the same painting to other authors.) The piece Paolini is willing to put his name on at Levy is the photograph, which supersedes both the Old Masters and the old moderns and takes us into conceptual space. Or maybe, by virtue of attaching a non-Western name to his painting, Paolini’s carrying us all the way forward into postmodernism.  All I know is that this is one mise-en-abyme that I’m happy to fall into. (Private Collection, Lugano, © Giulio Paolini; photo by Elisabeth Bernstein, courtesy Dominique Lévy Gallery, New York)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

(via thinkingimages)

About:

Following: